The Period of Hattian Culture (2500-2000 B.C.)
During the middle of the third millennium that early bronze age also started, a race of people, the Hatti, lived in Central Anatolia, which we learnt through the Hittite tablets. The Hittites even called their kingdom as the Land of the Hatti through their language, called as Nesian. The Hatti language (Hattic) is recognizable by its extensive use of prefixes and is different from all other Asian and Near Eastern languages. The influence of Hattic civilzation is also seen in Hittite religous rites, state and court ceremonies as well as in mythology. Hattusa, the Hittite capital, was originally a Hattic settlement. 

The pronounced Hattic elements in Hittite culture prove that Hattis had reached an advanced intellectual level. In fact the finest works of art of that period originated from the very heart of the old Hittite civilization. During the excavations carried out by Turkish archaelogists, Remzi Oguz Arık and Hamit Kosay, bronze, gold and silver objects of extaordinary beauty and value were unearthed.

The Early Hittite Period (2000-1750 B.C.) 
The influx of the Indo-European tribes into Asia Minor towards the end of the 3rd millenium ceased the impressive growth of the Hattic civilization. During the first quarter of the 2nd millenium there are a few Central Anatolian city-states that are ruled by minor potentates like Kanesh (Nesa), Kussara, Hattusa, Zalpa and Puruskhanda. These fell gradually into the hands of the Hittite rulers. 

Writing was brought to Anatolia in the days of the city-states through the Assyrian trade colonies. Early Hittite rulers like Anitta, king of Kussara, used the Mesopotamian cuneiform in the 18th century B.C.

The Old Hittite Kingdom (1750-1450 B.C.)
A few generations after Mursili I (1620-1590 BC) Hittites conquered first Aleppo and then Babylon, causing the downfall of Hammurabi dynasty state in the Near East.

The Hittite Empire (1450-1200 B.C.)
In the 15th and 14th centuries, the Hittites established a very important state while sharing the hegemony of the eastern world with the Egyptians, but creating a civilization of great originality and distinction. 

During this period Hurrian civilization exercised a strong influence on the Hittites. They adopted the Hurrian conception of the deities.

The Late Hittite Period (1200-700 B.C.)
Around 1180 B.C. Hattusa fell victim to the attacks by Thracians and late Hittite principalities became relatively active  after the fall of the Empire.

THE LOCATIONS THAT HITTITE WORKS OF ART CAN BE OBSERVED:

Istanbul
Archaelogical Museum & Old Eastern Works Museum 

Ankara
Anatolian Civilizations Museum
Sıhhiye Hittite Monument 

Çankırı
İnandıktepe 

Çorum
Alacahöyük
Alacahöyük Museum
Alacahöyük Gölpınar Dam
Hattusas
Boğazköy Museum
Yazılıkaya
Çorum Museum
Şapinuva (Ortaköy/Yerköy)
Hüseyindede
Yeniköy
Eskiyapar 

Amasya
Amasya Museum 

Tokat
Tapigga (Maşat Höyük-Zile) 

Sivas
Sarissa (Kuşaklı Höyük)
Dövlek 

Yozgat
Alişarhöyük 

Kayseri
Kültepe
Pınarbaşı Karakuyu Dam
Erciyes Fıraktın
Kayseri Museum 

Aksaray
Acemhöyük 

Konya
Ereğli İvriz 

Beyşehir
Eflatunpınar
Fasıllar 

Bodrum
Museum of Underwater Archaeology-Uluburun Ship Wreck Hall 

İçel
Tarsus 

Adana
Azativataya (Karatepe-Arslantaş)
Seyhan River Sirkeli
Adana Archaeology Museum 

Hatay
Alalah 

Gaziantep
Cerablus (Kargamış)
(Sam’al) Zincirlihöyük
Gaziantep Museum
Yesemek Open Air Museum
Sakçegözü 

Kahramanmaraş 

Malatya
Arslantepe 

Berlin
The Pergamon Museum 

USA
New York United Nations Headquarters
New York Metropolitan Museum 

Syria
Halab (Aleppo)
Ugarit (Ras Şamra)
Haleb Archaeology Museum
Tell Halaf
Ain Dara 

Egypt
Karnak Ramses II. Temple